wellowgate.png

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Wellow like this:
  • WELLOW, or Welhove, a hamlet in Great Grimsby parish, Lincoln; near Grimsby. An Augustinian canonry was founded here in the time of Henry I.; and was given, at the dissolution, to Sir T. Henneage.
This is the only descriptive gazetter entry we have found, but you may be able to find further references to Wellow by doing a full-text search here.


About 1110, the Abbey of Wellow, Grimsby, was founded by Henry I. for the Black Canons, and it was dedicated to St. Augustine. It was situated on a conical hill, about 25 metre high, and supplied with fresh water by a crystal spring which gushed out from the side of the hill, over which was erected the abbot's kitchen. The stream produced by this spring was sufficient to work a mill, which stood at the foot of the hill eastward from the abbey, without the cemetery, and at the entrance of the abbey-yard. The hill contained about ten acres, on which stood a court enclosed with a wall and ditch. There was also a grange for the residence of the abbot, the whole was occupied by gardens, orchards, and offices belonging to the abbey.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=tSmDDJyouIIC&pg=PA45&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lincs/vol2/pp161-163


After the Second World War Abbey House a large Victorian house standing on the site of the abbey, was leased to the Grimsby Royal Air Force Association Club.

In the 1890s it had been owned by the Wintringham family,


Family of John I Wintringham and Phebe Lambert

Husband: John Wintringham
Name:
John Wintringham
Sex:
Male
Father:
-
Mother:
-
Birth
c. 1810
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Census
1841 (age 30-31)
Ironmonger, Market Place, Great Grimsby (2 sons & 1 daughter)
Census
1851 (age 40-41)
Mayor & timber merchant, Holter Gate, Great Grimsby (3 daughters)
Census
1861 (age 50-51)
Timber merchant & JP, Pelham Terrace, Grimsby (2 sons, 3 daughters)
Census
1871 (age 60-61)
Timber merchant, Alderman & JP for Gt Grimsby, "Pelham Terrace", Deans Gate, Great Grimsby (2 daughters)
Death fact
1880 (age 69-70)
1880 Jun Qtr, Caistor, 7a/371 (aged 70)
Death
12 Apr 1880 (age 69-70)
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Wife: Phebe Lambert

Name:
Phebe Lambert
Sex:
Female
Father:
William Lambert ( - )
Mother:
Betsey Unknown ( - )
Birth
17 Dec 1809
Hull, Yorkshire
Baptism
17 May 1810 (age 0)
Kingston upon Hull, Yorkshire
Census
1881 (age 71-72)
Income from rents, 6 Pelham Terrace, Great Grimsby (widow)
Death fact
1884 (age 74-75)
1884 Jun Qtr, Caistor, 7a/384 (aged 74)
Death
19 May 1884 (age 74)
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Child 1: Sarah Eliza Wintringham

Name:
Sarah Eliza Wintringham
Sex:
Female
Spouse:
George Cutts (1823-1909)
Birth
1837
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Baptism
30 Jun 1837 (age 0)
Wesleyan Chapel, Grimsby, Lincs
Census
1841 (age 3-4)
Living with parents
Census
1851 (age 13-14)
Living with parents
Census
1901 (age 63-64)
Wife in household
Death fact
1914 (age 76-77)
1914 Jun Qtr, East Retford, 7b/20 (aged 77)
Death
28 Jun 1914 (age 76-77)
East Retford, Notts

Child 2: William Thomas Wintringham

Name:
William Thomas Wintringham
Sex:
Male
Spouse:
Frances Smith ( - )
Birth
1838
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Birth fact
1838 (age 0)
1838 Jun Q, Caistor, 14/294
Census
1841 (age 2-3)
Living with parents
Census
1851 (age 12-13)
Scholar, Wesley College, Glossop Road, Ecclesall Bierlow, Sheffield
Death fact
1884 (age 45-46)
1884 Jun Q, Penzance, 5c/205 (aged 45)
Death
2 Apr 1884 (age 45-46)
Penzance, Cornwall

Child 3: John Wintringham

Name:
John Wintringham
Sex:
Male
Birth
1840
Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire
Birth fact
1840 (age 0)
1840 Mar Q, Caistor, 14/307
Census
1841 (age 0-1)
Living with parents
Census
1851 (age 10-11)
Scholar, Wesley College, Glossop Road, Ecclesall Bierlow, Sheffield

Note on Husband: John Wintringham

6 August 1880. The Will of John Wintringham late of 6 Pelham Terrace Great Grimsby in the County of Lincoln Timber Merchant who died 12 April 1880 at Great Grimsby was proved at the Principal registry by Phebe Wintringham of 6 Pelham Terrace Widow the Relict William Thomas Wintringham Timber Merchant the Son Henry Smethurst the Younger Smack Owner both of Great Grimsby George Cutts of East Retford in the County of Nottingham Grocer and Thomas Stratten of the Borough of Kingston-upon-Hull Merchant the Executors. Personal Estate under £60,000.

Note on Wife: Phebe Lambert

29 August 1884. The Will with a Codicil of Phebe Wintringham late of Great Grimsby in the County of Lincoln Widow who died 19 May 1884 at Great Grimsby was proved at the Principal Registry by George Cutts of East Retford in the County of Nottingham Grocer and Henry Smethurst the Younger of Great Grimsby Smack Owner and John Wintringham of Great Grimsby Solicitor the Son the surviving Executors. Personal Estate £1,702 9s. 9d.


The Wintringhams and education


In the mid-19th century, Grimsby was expanding rapidly due to the arrival of the railways and the opening of the new docks. Many thousands were attracted to Grimsby both to live and to work. Many were young couples with children looking for a better life in the town. This was typical of what was happening elsewhere in the country as the Industrial Revolution centred in the towns and cities, prompting a boom in house building. New houses were soon built on both the East Marsh, West Marsh and later, during the 1880s, in New Clee.

Traditionally, young children had been educated by church schools and public/private fee-paying establishments, but these institutions throughout the country were soon unable to cope with the influx of children.

In the 1870s, a Grimsby survey showed that some 1,665 children were requiring regular education. Something had to be done and quickly.

In February, 1870, the Elementary Education Act, drafted by Liberal MP William Forster, was approved by Parliament after persistent campaigning by the National Education League, although some politicians thought that educating the poor and labouring classes was far too dangerous and could lead to revolution.

The Act soon saw the establishment of local school boards throughout England and Wales, funded by an extra council rate and a substantial annual grant from the Government, provided that all the schools successfully passed an annual inspection by a government school board inspector.

Grimsby rate payers elected their first school board members in the spring of 1874 with the inaugural board meeting on Wednesday, May 20.

Most of the board members who were "pledged to a secular system of education" were local businessmen. The board was comprised of; Alderman John Wintringham, Mr Henry Smethurst, Mr GS Dobson, Mr Cooper Snowden, Mr JK Riggall, Mr W Jackson and the Reverend W Marples, along with Mr William Grange as clerk.

Alderman John Wintringham was elected chairman and under his energetic leadership it soon embarked on a large and costly school-building programme.

He was a highly respected local businessman who had started as an ironmonger before entering into a partnership with Mr Joyes as Joyes & Wintringham Timber Merchants. He had been elected mayor in 1874 for the sixth time, he was a staunch Methodist and leader of the local Liberal Party. In the 1880s the family lived at The Abbey in Abbey Road.

One of the board's first, and arguably finest, new schools was Holme Hill in Heneage Road (opened in 1876) with its magnificent clock tower. This fine school was built to accommodate 1,165 children at a cost of £11,749.

In 1878, Hilda Street School, New Clee, opened for 520 children at a cost of £4,950. It was later extended in 1879
.
In 1880, South Parade school on the West Marsh opened at a cost of £5,250. This, too, was later extended.

By 1880, school attendance had became compulsory for all children living within one mile of a school and the school board truancy officers now ensured children attended all their classes.

In April that year, John Wintringham died. His son, also named John, a local solicitor, was duly elected school board chairman. John continued his father's ambitious school building programme during the 1880s with new schools built at Weelsby Street, Hamilton Street and Edward Street. In 1891,Welholme Road School for 750 children was built at a cost of £7,750.

John Wintringham II was a staunch methodist and aid the foundation stone for the Cleethorpes Methodist Chapel in St Peters Rd Cleethorpes 22 September 1884. The stone says he was of The Abbey.


During the ensuing years, many existing schools were also extended and modernised as the number of children in the Borough increased. On Thursday, October 24, 1895, the aptly named Wintringham Higher Grade School for 1,000 pupils, that had been built and furnished for £11,808, was opened in Eleanor Street, to great acclaim in the Grimsby News. It had a modern gymnasium, lecture theatre, swimming baths and a large chemical laboratory that was dubbed "the finest in the kingdom". All the great and the good of Grimsby attended the opening ceremony, including George Doughty MP and John Wintringham. In the afternoon there was a reception at the town hall, and in the evening at the school there was a Grand Evening Conversazione at which teachers from school across the town met in the main hall and danced to Mrs Hunt's Band until the early hours. This grand school would be a fitting epitaph to both the Wintringham family and the school board, for the year after Queen Victoria died in 1901, the 1902 Education Act (Balfour Act) abolished all the school boards, replacing them all with local education authorities and making secondary education compulsory.

Read more at http://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/school-board-built-strong-foundations-learning/story-15678146-detail/story.html#gMCzJlFY4qeGbk3Y.99

In response to the 1944 Education Act Wintringham Higher Grade School became a grammar school when Local Education Authorities were required to submit proposals to the new Department of Education for reorganising secondary schooling in their areas. Most LEAs aimed to establish the three main 'streams' or categories of school - grammar, secondary modern and technical - which had been recommended in a Report by Sir William Spens in 1938. Children would be allocated on the basis of an examination at the age of 11, known as the '11 plus'. This was intended to provide equal opportunities for children of all backgrounds.




Grimsby Extract 1881 Census
http://pubshistory.com/Lincolnshire/Grimsby/Grimsby1881/Grimsby1881a2.shtml


Local lists of historic assets of local interest

Grimsby
http://archive.nelincs.gov.uk/business/planning-and-development/heritage-and-conservation/local-list-historic-assets-special-interest/

Cleethorpes
file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/Local_List_of_Historic_Assets_of_Special_Interest.pdf

Clee etc
https://www.nelincs.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Adopted-Grimsby-Villages-LLA-minor-update-compressed.pdf

1887 Map of Grimsby
http://maps.nls.uk/view/101587526

Example of the use of social networking to establish an on line sense of place
http://www.rodcollins.com/wordpress/wellow-abbey-in-grimsby-lincolnshire-a-medieval-investigation